Patient Information

Symptoms & Conditions

Barrett’s Esophagus

Gastroenterology Associates of Beverly Hills’ experts can diagnose and treat Barrett’s esophagus. We utilize a multidisciplinary team approach to your healthcare, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete gastroenterological care.

Changes in the tissue structure at the lower part of esophagus is called Barrett’s esophagus. Usually it happens at the junction of the esophagus and stomach, and is usually due to continuous acid reflux. The tissue structure of the esophagus is not as resistant to acid as is the stomach tissue. Patients who are diagnosed with continuous acid reflux may have stomach acid that also comes up to the esophagus, which changes the esophageal tissue. This change of tissue is the introduction of a malignancy; thus the reason that Barrett’s esophagus is known as a pre-cancerous condition. It is extremely important to have proper treatment and care as soon as a diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus is made. Diagnosis can be made with an endoscopy procedure whereby the gastroenterologist can visibly see the damage.

Gastroenterology Associates offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions, including Barrett’s esophagus.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Celiac Disease

Our Gastroenterologists are experts in the care and treatment of Celiac Disease.  For the diagnosis of Celiac disease, they will take the extra time to carefully and thoroughly examine the patient’s complete medical history.  To treat this disorder, they will discuss with each individual patient the treatment options and dietary adjustments that are right for that particular patient.

Celiac disease is oversensitivity to “gluten” in the small intestine. Gluten is a kind of protein that can be found in wheat, barley, rye and any food that contains these grains. Oversensitivity is the result of overreaction of a patient’s immune system to gluten (it is also called gluten sensitive enteropathy). This overreaction can damage the tissue of the small intestine. As a matter of fact, the small intestine is the main place to absorb essential and vital elements such as vitamin B12, iron, lipids and lipid soluble vitamins.  Symptoms of Celiac disease can include anemia, diarrhea and malabsorption, loss of bone density, weight loss, bloating and gas, fatigue, and skin rash.  In certain cases, children’s growth may be affected. Completely avoiding gluten containing foods is the best treatment!

Celiac disease occurs more in patients with European ancestry, Caucasians and type 1 Diabetic patients. It is not completely clear why Celiac disease develops, but it can be associated with the involvement of an immune system reaction. As with other autoimmune diseases, it is more common in women than men.

Diagnosis can be made with serologic tests (the measurement of antibodies).  Remember it is an immune system reaction, so the body makes antibodies against gluten. The best diagnostic tool is a biopsy of the small intestine that can be studied under a microscope. Normal villi will look like fingers projecting, and in celiac disease the villi changes to flat look without the projection. Also, the tissue shows specific features that are characteristic with celiac disease. A biopsy is the most accurate way for the diagnosis of celiac disease.

It is very important for patients to follow their physician’s treatment strategy due to the nature of this disease. Celiac disease has the ability to reoccur, even though the patient is following a gluten free diet. If the patient sees an improvement of symptoms after following a gluten free diet for a while, but still a recurrence of the disease occurs, this is known as Refractory celiac disease. On the other hand if the patient does not see any improvement with a gluten free diet, this is known as a nonresponsive form of celiac disease.

Celiac disease may cause a skin rash that called dermatitis herpetiform. It is characterized by itching and fluid filled rash-like bumps. It usually occurs on the forearm, scalp, knee and buttock.  The immune system is making antibodies to the disease; however, these antibodies sit in the skin as a foreign particle causing itching and a rash reaction. Usually there is no need for special treatment. It should go away with a gluten free diet.

Our center utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach to your healthcare, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete gastroenterological care, including Celiac Disease.

We offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Chronic Liver Disease

If you have been diagnosed with liver disease, it should be taken very seriously by you and your gastroenterologist.  Unfortunately, liver disease can be a cause of morbidity and mortality.  It affects people of all ages, but most liver disease is diagnosed between the ages of 40 and 60 years.  Most recently, liver disease has benefited from extensive medical research, resulting in major improvements in the survival and quality-of-life of patients.

In treating Liver Disease, our center utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete care.

We offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide range of liver diseases such as hepatitis (viral or autoimmune), primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

If a liver disease patient were to experience a complication or concern while under our care, they should contact us immediately, as our board certified, multidisciplinary team will be at their disposal.  Our physicians are available at all times by email/phone if serious concerns arise.

More information about Liver Disease below:

The liver is a multifunctional organ. It is in charge of breaking down the large food elements to absorbable particles, making blood coagulation factors, storing and metabolizing lipids and proteins, activating and deactivating medications and metabolizing poisons. There are various types of liver disease such as hepatitis (viral or autoimmune), primary biliary cirrhosis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, hemochromatosis, Wilson’s disease, Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Let’s take a brief look at each of these.

Hepatitis

Hepatitis can be viral, autoimmune or drug induced. Viral hepatitis can be caused by hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, G virus.

Hepatitis A and E are transmitted by contaminated food and water. They are ingested orally and the patients do not usually have symptoms for several weeks. The hepatitis A and E virus infection never causes cirrhosis or liver cancer.

Hepatitis B, C and D are transmitted from mother to child, sexual contact, blood transfusion, needle stick injuries and needle sharing. Hepatitis B and C may lead to chronic liver disease, cirrhosis and liver cancer. Hepatitis C is one of the main causes for liver transplant in the United States. Patients with hepatitis B or C have various symptoms such as jaundice, dark urine, fatigue, malaise, weight loss and light colored stool. Blood tests will be used to first diagnose hepatitis. It is very important for patients diagnosed with hepatitis to manage their condition, as unmanaged hepatitis may lead to liver cancer.

You can prevent Hepatitis B by getting vaccinated. Unfortunately there is no vaccine for hepatitis C at this time.

Hepatitis G was once diagnosed, but there is no knowledge of any reported cases at this time.

Patients with liver disease require an expert multidisciplinary team to understand the condition and manage to achieve the best outcome. At GABH, our efforts are to slow, stop and treat the illness in order to achieve the best prognosis. Our doctors will provide the most recent therapies for their patients to treat their condition.

Our skilled doctors are specialists in taking care of patients with different liver diseases: Hepatitis (A, B, C, and D), autoimmune hepatitis, hemochromatosis, primary biliary cirrhosis, hepatic encephalopathy, portal hypertension, liver tumors and cancer, unexplained elevation in liver enzymes, congenital liver disease and end stage liver disease.

Due to the nature of liver disease, some patients need other types of medical care such as a nutritionist, dietitian, or social worker.  Gastroenterology Associates of Beverly Hills is part of a multi-disciplinary team, and can offer all these needs for our patients within our office.

We know living with liver disease is a challenge.  Our team is trained and dedicated to manage and cure liver disease in the best possible way.

Consistent communication is one of the most important keys in hepatitis management. Our physicians will sit with the patient and listen to concerns and answer any questions regarding this issue.

We offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Colorectal Cancer

Gastroenterology Associates are experts in screening for colorectal cancer.  Their up-to-date knowledge and skills, along with access to the latest technology serve their patients well.  It is important to ask your primary care physician about routine colon cancer screenings or if you prefer, contact our office for assistance in determining if you are at risk.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world. There are few factors that increase the risk of colon cancer:

  • Family history of colon cancer: There is a higher chance of colon cancer if an individual has a first degree family member or several family members (second degree) with colon cancer, or if it occurs in early age (less than 55 years).
  • Personal history of colon cancer or polyps: Patients with a history of colon cancer that are cured or adenomatous polyps before age 60 years are at an increased risk for developing colorectal cancer.
  • History of radiation therapy for cancer: Radiation therapy directed to the abdomen in order of previous cancer treating can increase the chance of colon cancer.
  • Aging: 90 percent of colorectal cancers occurs in people older than 50 years of age this is the reason of necessity of colon cancer screening at age 50. Risk increases with aging.
  • Race: African-Americans have a higher risk of developing colon cancer compared to other races.
  • Lifestyle factors: high fat diet, low fiber diet, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, alcohol and obesity are other factors that can increase the chance of colon cancer.
  • Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP): it is inherited condition that presents with polyp in colon. Almost 100 percent of patients develop colon cancer (usually by the age of 50). These patients need to start colonoscopy for early diagnosis at early age (before age of 25).
  • Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC): This is a condition that at least 3 members of a family in 2 generations are diagnosed with colon cancer and one of them occurring at an early age (less than 50 years). Usually there is high incidence of ovarian and endometrial cancer in these patients.
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD): chronic ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease have higher risks for developing colon cancer. This is the reason that patients diagnosed with IBD are recommended to have surveillance colonoscopy screenings after being diagnosed with IBD.

There are factors that decrease the risk of colon cancer:

  • Aspirin and related medications in this group (called NSAID) may decrease the chance of developing colon cancer.
  • Calcium: Studies have shown people who have a higher calcium intake, have a lower chance of developing colon cancer.

Fortunately colon cancer is preventable. A person without a self and/or family history of colon cancer should begin to schedule regular screening colonoscopies at age 50. Usually the first manifestation or introduction to colon cancer is a polyp. A polyp is small clump of cells that forms the lining of the colon. The doctor removes a polyp and sends it to the lab. The polyps are classified into different groups which determine how often the patient needs to have a colonoscopy. The doctor will review this pathology report with you.

Colon Cancer has different symptoms which may include:

Bright colored blood in the stool or rectal bleeding, thin caliber stool, continual constipation or diarrhea (changes in bowel habits), unintentional weight loss, frequent discomfort in the lower abdomen, bloating that does not improve with treatment, anemia, weakness and fatigue.

There are different colon cancer screening tests:

  • Colonoscopy: it is the most accurate and available method. It allows the physician to look at and examine the entire colon. Please look at the colonoscopy section for more detail.
  • Sigmoidoscopy: It is similar to a colonoscopy but only the rectum and the lower part of colon will be seen. While a colonoscopy looks at the entire colon, sigmoidoscopy is helpful when the location of the tumor or polyp is in the rectum and lower part of the colon. Please look at the Sigmoidoscopy section for more information.
  • Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT):  A FOBT is an easy and inexpensive tool for detection of blood in the stool. It does not replace a colonoscopy but is a good tool for quick screening/evaluation. Not all detection of blood in the stool is cancer; it can be from hemorrhoids, polyps or ulcerative colitis.

Our center utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach to your healthcare, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete gastroenterological care.

We offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Crohn’s Disease

Gastroenterology Associates of Beverly Hills are experts in treating and managing Crohn’s Disease.  Our center utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach to treating your Crohn’s Disease, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete gastroenterological care.

Crohn’s disease belongs to the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) group.  It can involve any part of GI system but mostly it has a tendency to occur in the small intestine (ileum part: 2nd part of small intestine). The disease is known as an autoimmune disease. It means the immune system of the body does not recognize self from non-self, so it attacks healthy cells and causes symptoms of the specific autoimmune disease, in this case, Crohn’s disease. This is the reason that Crohn’s disease symptoms are not limited to the digestive system. A patient can have symptoms in their skin, joints, kidneys, eyes, etc.

Patients of any age can experience symptoms of Crohn’s disease, but the peak age is usually 15-30 years of age. It is found more commonly in the Jewish population with males and females equally affected. There is possibility of a genetic role in the transmission of disease as Crohn’s disease involvement seems to be found within some families. Genetics may play a role in the transmission of Crohn’s disease.

Patient can presents with different symptoms: diarrhea (can be bloody), abdominal pain and cramping, weight loss, anemia, fever.  If a patient has Crohn’s disease as a child, it may affect their growth. Diarrhea can occur for a longer period of time with children and may not improve with usual treatment.

As mentioned earlier, the involved portion that has inflammation can spread to the bowel wall and cause stenosis (scarring) or it can make a pathway into the intestinal wall to neighboring organs (fistula). It can also connect to a wall of an artery and cause bleeding. Crohn’s disease has 2 different phases: remission (stabilization of symptoms) and flare up (attack phase). Some patients are in remission for a long time and experience flare ups only a few times in their life time.

Proper diagnosis of Crohn’s Disease requires a complete health work-up. Since this disease affects the digestive system, a colonoscopy and endoscopy are necessary. The doctor will be able to look at all parts of the digestive system and take the appropriate tissue samples. The gastroenterologist is able to look at different parts of the digestive system and can take tissue samples. This is the most accurate way to diagnose Crohn’s disease.  The doctor can pinpoint the part of the digestive system that is involved, determine the severity of the disease, and also choose the right treatment. One of the first steps for diagnosing Crohn’s Disease is a blood test that checks for antibodies and markers for the disease.

There is no cure for Crohn’s disease; however there are medications available to help manage the symptoms. The goal of treatment is to keep the patient in the remission phase as long as possible.  As long as it is silent and under control, the patient can live with the disease. Medications can be prescribed that calm the immune system activity to a lower level of activity.   If medication does not work to manage the symptoms, surgery can be an option to remove the affected part of the intestine.

We offer the most advanced, diagnostic techniques and treatments available for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Diarrhea/Constipation

Diarrhea: When the intestines don’t absorb enough fluids

After a meal, your small intestine absorbs fluid and nutrients from the food you’ve eaten. Your colon absorbs most of the remaining liquid from digested food particles to form semisolid stools. Anything that disrupts this process may cause diarrhea. For example:

  • Viral infection. This is the most common cause of diarrhea. An invading virus can damage the lining of the small intestine, disrupting fluid and nutrient absorption. Typically, symptoms improve on their own within one to three days.
  • Bacterial infection. Certain bacteria in contaminated food or water can release a toxin that causes your intestinal cells to secrete salt and water. This overwhelms the capacity of your small intestine and colon to absorb fluid. Typically, symptoms improve on their own within one to three days.
  • Other inflammatory agents. Sometimes diarrhea is caused by a parasite or a reaction to medication, such as antibiotics. Once the parasite is eliminated or an offending antibiotic is discontinued, the diarrhea usually disappears.
  • Excessive caffeine or alcohol. Caffeine and alcohol stimulate the passage of stool. Too much may cause waste to move through your small intestine and colon too quickly.
  • Intestinal disorder. Diarrhea that persists or recurs often may be related to an intestinal disorder. Possible causes include irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, lactose intolerance or celiac disease.

 

Self-care for diarrhea

Diarrhea ordinarily clears up on its own, without the need for antibiotics or other medications. Take care of yourself while you’re recovering:

  • Drink plenty of fluids. Try water, caffeine-free tea, diluted juices or beverages containing electrolytes, such as Gatorade or Powerade.
  • Gradually add solid foods to your diet. Begin with easily digested food such as crackers, toast, rice, cereal and chicken.
  • Avoid anything that may prolong diarrhea. Wait a few days before consuming dairy products, fatty foods, spicy foods and beverages containing caffeine or alcohol.
  • Don’t take antacids containing magnesium. Magnesium can cause diarrhea.

 

Constipation: When stools are dry and hard to pass

Constipation is the repeated painful or difficult passage of hard stool or having a bowel movement only once or twice a week. It’s not the absence of a bowel movement every day.

Your colon absorbs water from food residue. As food waste stays in your colon, it progressively loses water content. Eventually, the waste becomes dry and difficult to pass. Here are a few common culprits:

  • Age. As you get older, muscles in your digestive tract may become less active.
  • Eating and drinking habits. A low-fiber diet and lack of fluids may lead to constipation.
  • Sedentary lifestyle. Lack of physical activity is sometimes the problem.
  • Medication. Constipation may be a side effect of various drugs, including those used to treat Parkinson’s disease, high blood pressure, pain and depression.
  • Inattention to bowel habits. Frequent use of laxatives or repeatedly ignoring the urge to have a bowel movement may result in constipation.
  • Other medical problems. Various conditions can be associated with prolonged constipation, including hypothyroidism and Parkinson’s disease.

 

Self-care for constipation

Lifestyle changes are often the safest way to manage constipation. To help ease symptoms:

  • Drink plenty of fluids. Liquid helps keep your stool soft. Drink water or another fluid whenever you eat, and always have some water when you’re thirsty.
  • Eat more fiber. Fiber helps bulk up and soften stool so that it passes smoothly through the digestive tract. Try beans, bran cereal, whole-wheat products, fruit and vegetables. To avoid problems with gas, add high-fiber foods to your diet slowly.
  • Enjoy regular meals. Eating on a regular schedule promotes normal bowel function.
  • Get physical. Exercise stimulates the intestinal muscles, which speeds the passage of food through your digestive tract.
  • Heed nature’s call. The longer you delay going to the bathroom once you feel the urge, the harder and drier your stool becomes.
  • Reduce stress. Stress can slow digestion.

 

When to see your doctor

Generally, constipation and diarrhea are temporary conditions. Sometimes, however, they can indicate more serious problems. Consult your doctor if you experience:

  • Diarrhea that lasts longer than three days or is accompanied by fever, dizziness or lightheadedness
  • Constipation that lasts longer than seven days, despite changes in diet or exercise
  • An unexplained change in bowel patterns or habits
  • Blood in your stool
  • Intense abdominal pain

Treatment will depend on what’s causing your symptoms.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

As many as one in five Americans have IBS symptoms making it one of the most common disorders diagnosed by doctors. It occurs more often in women than in men.  It can be extremely frustrating and at times a debilitating condition that interferes with normal daily life, including job performance and social life.

Unfortunately, for many diagnosed with IBS, there is also a sense of frustration in regards to how they are perceived and treated by their physician.  Many feel that because IBS conditions are so varied, they are not taken seriously, and that only basic symptoms are just treated, without consideration to their overall gastrointestinal health.

At Gastroenterology Associates, we consider IBS a condition that needs to be properly diagnosed. Other, more serious causes need to be considered and either treated or ruled out first.  Our physicians work with the IBS patient individually to create a treatment plan tailored to their diagnosis, not a general one-size fits all treatment. Also, our physicians want the patient to play an active role in their diagnosis and treatment, and will work with the patient to make sure the treatment plan is working.  Our physicians can be accessed via email if serious concerns arise or symptoms change and need to be addressed.

Learn more about IBS below:

IBS or irritable bowel syndrome is a combination of abdominal cramping, bloating or a change in bowel movements (diarrhea, constipation). IBS affects the intestines and the symptoms can be uncomfortable. Patients may have diarrhea (IBS-D), constipation (IBS-C) or a combination of both diarrhea and constipation (IBS-M). It can be debilitating and even hinder routine, daily tasks. IBS is a functional problem and is not the result of a germ or bacteria. IBS does not cause intestinal bleeding, bowel obstruction or cancer.

IBS can be affected by diet, lifestyle, hormones and stress. Although there are some patients with symptoms that do not improve with lifestyle modifications. Unfortunately, many patients are often misdiagnosed or labeled with a psychiatric condition.

Diagnosing IBS is based on ruling out other possibilities, therefore there are a few tests that have to done before properly diagnosing someone with IBS. Testing may include blood work, diagnostic studies, urine testing, stool testing, colonoscopy and endoscopy.

Treatment of IBS is based on different factors: age, severity of IBS and tolerance of the patient. Some patients achieve relief or reduce their symptoms by slowly adding more fiber into their diet. Some patients may experience relief with medications. There are many ways to help improve the symptoms for those with IBS.

Our experienced physicians are three of the best in this field and are up-to-date with the most current data. They will spend time with you and carefully listen to your concerns. You are treated like a family member to us and we aim to provide the highest level of care to our patients. Our doctors have seen many IBS patients and are helpful and accurate in their treatment strategies. Each case has a different, appropriate approach and treatment plan. We have highly flexible strategies without the need to repeat unnecessary tests.

This is the reason that so many from across the country and world travel to GABH for treatment.

Our center utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach to your healthcare, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete gastroenterological care.

We offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Lactose Intolerance

The experts at Gastroenterology Associate of Beverly Hills have new and unique technology called Lactose Intolerance Breath Test to help in diagnosing lactose intolerance.  This testing is offered in very few gastroenterology practices, but is very helping with a definitive diagnosis of lactose intolerance.

The inability to digest lactose is called lactose intolerance or lactase deficiency. Lactose is the name of the sugar found in milk and all dairy products except for yogurt. The normal processing of milk and dairy products start with breaking the milk sugar, lactose, into to two simple and absorbable sugar molecules that is glucose and galactose. This process is done by the enzyme called lactase. There are people who do not have the enzyme or have less than normal levels of this enzyme or those who cannot digest it. Therefore, lactose stays in the gastrointestinal system and moves to the colon in an undigested form. It will then interact with normal intestinal bacteria and causes symptoms such as bloating, diarrhea, and abdominal discomfort.

Factors that are involved with lactose intolerance are:

  • Aging: Studies show that there is a higher risk of lactose intolerance with increased age.
  • Race: It is more common in American-Indians, African-Americans, Hispanics and Asians.
  • Premature birth: Prematurity increases the likelihood of lactose intolerance.
  • Small intestinal disease: Small intestinal bacteria overgrowth (SIBO), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and celiac disease increase the likelihood of lactose intolerance.

Symptoms can include diarrhea, bloating, nausea, abdominal cramping and pain.

Based on the amount of lactose in food and each individual’s tolerance, the severity of symptoms can vary. Usually a patient determines the particular food that make the symptoms worse and will then seek treatment.

Diagnosis is done by a simple test called lactose intolerance breath test.

The treatment is based on the severity of intolerance, patient age and tolerance of condition. There is not a specific treatment to make body to produce the enzyme, lactase, but following a proper diet and possibly adding the enzyme, lactase may be helpful.

It is important to know that dairy products are a good source of calcium and omitting dairy from the diet can cause low levels of calcium in the body. It is advised to add other sources of calcium into the daily diet, such as green vegetables, yogurt, and fish.

Our center utilizes a multidisciplinary team approach to your healthcare, which means that patients benefit from the combined expertise of physicians who have the knowledge, perspective and experience to address all aspects of your complete gastroenterological care.

We offer the most advanced diagnostic techniques and treatments for a wide variety of gastroenterological conditions.  We also offer a full range of diagnostic procedures, as well as medical, surgical and minimally invasive treatment options to meet the individual needs of patients with gastroenterological conditions of any kind.  Contact us if you are experiencing gastrointestinal issues that have not yet been addressed by our physicians.

Ulcers

A peptic ulcer is a sore in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). Individuals of any age can develop an ulcer and men and women are affected equally. Over 25 million Americans will suffer from an ulcer at some point during their lifetime. The good news is that most ulcers are caused by an infection with the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), and can be cured with a two week course of antibiotics.

Ulcer Facts

Most ulcers are caused by an infection, not spicy food, acid or stress. The most common symptom of an ulcer is burning pain in the stomach. Your doctor can test you for an H. pylori infection. Antibiotics are the new cure for ulcers if it is caused by a bacteria. Eliminating H. pylori infections with antibiotics means that your ulcer can be cured.